Scott Baio Fan Blog


Channel 4 review of “Bugsy Malone”
April 18, 2008, 2:23 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

“A  city  slicker.  He  can  charm  you.  With  a  smile  and  a  style  all  his  own.  Everybody  loves  that  man.  Bugsy  Malone.”

“Drive-by  shootings,  gang  warfare,  gun  crime  and  lethal  saturated  fats.  Alan  Parker’s  kiddie  gangster  pastiche  might  have  been  tailor-made  to  exorcise  the  twenty-first  century  ‘Daily  Mail’.  Yet  when  it  was  released  in  1976,  critics  decided  it  was  too  cute  for  school.  They  knew  nothing.  Parker’s  feature  debut,  described  by  the  director  as  the  work  of  a  madman,  is  an  audacious  parody  of  Prohibition-era  pulp  fiction  that  throws  gravel  in  the  face  of  bonnet-wearing  1970s  British  children’s  dramas  like  ‘The  Railway  Children’   by  refusing  to  accept  it’s  a  kid’s  film  at  all.

In  a  plot  that  wouldn’t  fill  the  first  chapter  of  a  dime  store  pulp  thriller,  BUGSY  MALONE  ( SCOTT  BAIO )  IS  THE  GENIAL  SCAMSTER recruited  by  bar  owner  Fat  Sam  ( John  Cassisi )  to  help  in  the  war  against  Dandy  Dan  ( Martin  Lev )  and  his  gang  who  have  come  up  with  a  lethal  new  custard  pie  delivery  system:  the  splurge  gun.  Bugsy  also  steals  the  heart  of  wannabe  starlet  Blousey  Brown  ( Florrie  Dugger ),  but  pouting  in  the  shadows  is  the  almost  inappropriately  seductive  singer  Tallulah  ( Jodie  Foster  –  fresh,  if  that’s  the  word,  from  ‘Taxi  Driver’ ).

BAIO,  WITH  ‘HAPPY  DAYS’  STILL  TO  LOOK  FORWARD  TO,  MAKES  A  WINSOME  LITTLE  LEAD while  Cassisi  and  Lev,  neither  of  whom  would  act  again  ( ME  sufferer  Lev  committed  suicide  in  1992 )  are  as  promising  and  unaffected  as  their  cotton-mouthed  accents  allow.  Bonnie  Langford  is  wisely  kept  away  from  Foster’s  untouchable  teenage  vamp  and  a  cherubic  nine-year  old  Dexter  Fletcher  runs  away  with  his  single  scene  wielding  a  baseball  bat.  But  let’s  not  pretend  all  these  performers  are  precocious  screen  presences.  Just  off  camera,  you  can  imagine  –  indeed  sometimes  almost  see  –  grinning  kids  falling  about,  incredulous  that  this  entire  thing’s  working  at  all.

Composer  Paul  Williams,  a  songwriter  who’d  written  hits  for  The  Carpenters  and  had  his  material  covered  by  Elvis,  won  an  Oscar  nomination  for  his  score.  And  it’s  the  songs  that  breathe  life into  ‘BUGSY  MALONE’.  The  infectious stomp  of  ‘Bad  Guys’,  ‘So  You  Wanna  Be  A  Boxer’, ‘ Fat  Sam’s  Grandslam  Speakeasy’  and  ‘Down  and  Out’  almost  swamp  William’s  wry  way  with  a  lyric.  ( Ella  Fitzgerald  once  covered  ‘Ordinary  Fool’,  though  to  be  fair  so  did  Mel  Torme. )  Why  none  of  this  material  has  received  the  treatment  Jay  Z  gave  the  considerably  less  memorable  ‘It’s  A  Hard  Knock  Life’  from  ‘Annie’  remains  a  mystery.

Parents  should  beware.  The  infectious  energy  might  have  been  designed  to  recruit  otherwise  well-balanced  kids  to  stage  school.  But  let’s  see  a  Harry  Potter  movie  sneak  in  the  line  addressed  by  Fat  Sam  to  some  errant  poultry:  ‘Get  out  of  here,  you  dumb  clucks!’

VERDICT:  The  best  children – dressed – as – gangsters – while – killing – each – other – with – custard  film  ever  made.”

RATING:  3.5

by  Jon  Fortgang,   Channel  4  Film.

AWARDS  TRIVIA :  Bugsy  Malone earned  three  ( 3 )  Golden  Globe  nominations  from  the  Hollywood  Foreign  Press  Association  in  the  categories  of  Best  Comedy  or  Musical  Picture,  Best  Original  Score  and  Best  Song  for  the  title  track.

Advertisements