Scott Baio Fan Blog


House Of Self-Indulgence Review of “Foxes”
May 19, 2010, 2:50 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

The  portrait  of  Los  Angeles  in  the  late  1970s  as  a  frivolous  wasteland  full  of  inane  people  petering  out  their  apathetic  lives  in  a  smog-fueled  daze  has  been  done  to  death.  The  wonderfully  naturalistic  Foxes,  on  the  other  hand,  perfectly  captures  the  palpable  energy  of  the  city  in  a  new  and  entirely  unique  manner.  Depicting  it  as  a  place  where  everyone  comes  from  a  broken  home  and  SCOTT  BAIO  is  a  sensitive  skateboard  enthusiast,  Adrian  Lyne  has  created  a  thoughtful  coming-of-age  story  that  is  rich  with  amazing  cinematography  ( the  sunny,  burnout  quality  of  the  photography  made  Hollywood  Boulevard  look  as  enticing  as  ever ),  a  sleek  score  by  Giorgio  Moroder              ( repeatedly  complimented  by  Donna  Summer’s  soothing  “On  The  Radio” ),  and  some  of  the  finest  teen  acting  I’ve  seen  in  quite  some  time.

Revolving  around  four  friends:  Jeanie  ( Jodie  Foster ),  the  responsible  one;  Annie  ( Cherie  Currie ),  the  rebellious  one;  Madge  ( Marilyn  Kagan ),  the  reticent  one;  and  Deirdre  ( Kandice  Stroh ),  the  refined  one.  This  girly  foursome  look  out  for  one  another  like  most  friends  do,  but  they  mostly  find  themselves  taking  care  of  the  aimless Annie  who  has  a  tendency  to  wander  off  on  these  strange  narcotic-related  tangents.  This  errant  behavior  worries  the  other  members  of  their  little  idiosyncratic  clique,  especially  Jeanie  who  bares  most  of   the  burden  when  it  comes  to  Annie  and  her  unpredictable  antics.  However,  it  should  be  said  that  Annie  is  not  the  only  one  with  problems  as  the  stressed  out  Jeanie,  the  virginal  Madge  and  the  seductive  Deirdre  have  their  own  issues  to  deal  with.

Beyond  a  scene  that  involves  the  girls  taking  care  of  plastic  babies  in  some  sort  of  home  economics  class  and  a  couple  of  hallway  moments,  the  film  spends  hardly  any  time  at  school.  Which  is  kinda  appropriate  because  neither  do  the  characters.  Nope,  the  majority  of  the  film  takes  place  in  the  unstable  homes  of  the  four  girls.  Well,  except  for  Deirdre,  but  I’m  sure  her  home  life  was  all  kinds  of  kooky.  Anyway,  the  bond  these  girls  share  as  they  engage  in  sleepovers,  attend  concerts  ( Jeanie’s  dad  manages  a  rock  band ),  and  throw  dinner  parties  is  the  main  strength  of  the  film.  I  also  liked  how  each  girl  is  given  her  own  unique  personality.  Yeah,  they  probably  wouldn’t  be  friends  in  real  life  ( young  people  and  people  in  general  tend  to  hang  out  with  other  people  who  are  most  like  themselves ).  But  nonetheless,  I  appreciated  the  fact  that  an  attempt  was  made  to  flesh  out  each  character  ( like  the  fact  that  Deirdre  doesn’t  know  how  to  shop  for  groceries ).

The  acting  in  Foxes was  superb  across  the  board.  Sure,  there  were  a  couple  of  dodgy  moments   involving  Sally  Kellerman  as  Jeanie’s  flaky  mom  that  gave  me  pause.  But  on  the  whole,  I  found  the  cast  to  be  topnotch  in  terms  of  raw  emotion  and  unaffected  pathos.  She  may  have  been  only  a  teenager  at  the  time  but  Jodie  Foster  displays  a  real  maturity  as  Jeanie.  The  fact  that  she  plays  the  most  reliable  person  in  the  entire  group  might  have  illuminated  this  trait  more  substantially.  However,  there’s  no  denying  that  Jodie  gives  an  impressive  performance.  Her  best  scenes,  funny  enough,  are  when  she’s  with  SCOTT  BAIO,  who  I  must  say,  does  a  great  job  of  listening  to  Jodie  as  she  waxes  semi-poetically  about  her  nerve-wracking  existence.

The  bespectacled  and  slightly  awkward  Marilyn  Kagan  somehow  manages  to  turn  the  dorky  Madge  into  my  favorite  Fox.  Which  is  not  the  easiest  thing  to  accomplish  when  you  consider  that  Miss Foster  and  the  charismatic  Cherie  Currie  are  constantly  wandering  around  in  the  background.  The  whiny,  teen-based  turmoil  surrounding  Madge’s  relationship  with  her  insufferable  mother  are  what  drew  me  to  the  character  in  the  first  place.  There’s  real  pain  there  and  Kagan  draws  it  out  in  a  genuine  manner.

Lithesome  and  sporting  the  blankest  of  expressions,  Cherie  Currie  gives  a  hypnotic  performance  as  the  troubled  Annie.  You  can  totally  see  why  everyone ,  including  Jodie’s  character,  is  drawn  to  her.  She  has  a   magnetic  quality  about  her  that  just  sort  of  messes  with  you.  And  it’s  not  a  looks  thing  either,  as  I  didn’t  really  find  her  to  be  that  appealing,  you  know,  physically          ( Kandice  Stroh’s  Deirdre  is  the  babe  of  the  picture ).  No,  there  was  something  strangely  alluring  about  Miss  Currie  as  Annie.  I  can’t  quite  put  my  finger  on  it  but  she  exudes  a  special  type  of  allure  that  not  everyone  possesses.

by  Yum-Yum,   houseofself-indulgence.blogspot.com :  April  10,  2009

FOXY  TRIVIA :  Kristy  McNichol  and  Rosanna  Arquette  were  originally  considered  to  play  the  role  of  Annie.

Advertisements