Scott Baio Fan Blog


“ZAPPED!” In Context : The Fall Of The 1980s Teen Sex Comedies
March 24, 2011, 2:29 am
Filed under: Uncategorized

VIRGIN   TERRITORY ,  Part  3    by   Chris  Nashawaty

Entertainment  Weekly   ( April  13,  2007 )

By  President  Ronald  Reagan’s  second  inauguration  in  1985,  the  party  was  over  in  more  ways  than  one.  The  once  innocent  sex  comedies  of  just  a  few  years  earlier  were  starting  to  develop  a  nasty,  malicious  aftertaste.  With  the  exception  of  1984’s  truly  classic  Revenge  Of  The  Nerds ( the  ‘Magnificent  Ambersons’  of  teen  sex  comedies  to  Fast  Times  At  Ridgemont  High‘s  ‘Citizen  Kane’ ),  disposable  knockoffs  like  The  Big  Bet,  Loose  Screws,  Fraternity  Vacation,  Hot  Moves,  and  Hardbodies 2 seemed  to  regard  women  more  and  more  as  the  enemy.  There  was  nothing  romantic  about  “losin’  it”  anymore.  These  women  were  suckers  to  be  lied  to,  drugged,  and  otherwise  shanghaied  into  having  sex.  That’s  not  just  a  buzzkill,  them’s  felonies.  These  late  arrivals  to  the  party  seemed  to  believe  that  they  had  to  sink  lower  to  keep up.

It  was  a  fatal  miscalculation,  as  teenagers  began  migrating  over  to  the  more  wholesome  films  of  John  Hughes  ( The  Breakfast  Club,  Ferris  Bueller’s  Day Off,  Pretty  In  Pink ).  All  of  a  sudden,  the  albatross  of  virginity  didn’t  seem  quite  as  cumbersome  now  that  even  Molly  Ringwald  was  saving  herself  for  Mr.  Right.  Meanwhile,  the  young  actors  who’d  given  the  teen  sex  comedies  their  early,  giddy  sheen  had  moved  on  to  greener  pastures  too.  Among  them  were  Fast  Times‘  Sean  Penn,  Fraternity  Vacation‘s  Tim  Robbins,  Private  Resort‘s  Johnny  Depp,  and  Losin’  It‘s  Tom  Cruise.  Even  ZAPPED! ‘s  dynamically  dim  duo,  SCOTT  BAIO  and  Willie  Aames,  managed  to  squeak  out  a  second  life  in  the  sitcom   CHARLES  IN  CHARGE.


(  “SCOTT  BAIO  and  Willie  Aames  were  the  Freddie  Prinze  Jr.  and  Matthew  Lillard  of  their  day.  But  who  are  the  Freddie  Prinze  Jr.  and  Matthew  Lillard  of  our  day??  This  haunts  me.”  –  Eric  D.  Snider,            “Top  10  Movies  That  I  Am  Thinking  Of  Right  Now”,  www.film.com,             September  27,  2010  )

By  the  time  a  popularity-craving  Patrick  Dempsey  was  paying  a  snotty  cheerleader  $  1000  to  pretend  to  be  his  girlfriend  in  1987’s  Can’t  Buy  Me  Love,  the  genre  was  on  life  support.  And  there  it  stayed  for  the  next  twelve  years  until  1999’s  American  Pie came  along,  acting  like  it  was  the  first  movie  to  ever  chronicle  randy  teens.  I  don’t  know  if  it’s  just  fuzzy  nostalgia  or  a  trick  of  age,  but  to  me,  a  movie  like  American  Pie ( or  Van  Wilder or  Road  Trip )  cannot  hold  a  candle  to  something  like  Revenge  Of  The  Nerds,  Fast  Times  At  Ridgemont  High,  or  even  Private  School.  These  newer  films  seemed  too  indebted  to  their  elders  and  too  cool  to  acknowledge  that  debt.        I  mean,  how  revolutionary  was  it  really  to  have  Jason  Biggs  humping  an  apple  pie  after  Kent  had  his  way  with  a  bowl  of  Jell-O  in  Real  Genius?  This  new  breed  of  teen  sex  comedies  carried  with  them  a  condescending  ironic  distance  that  implied  that  they  weren’t  just  part  of  the  genre,  but  also better  than  it.  Above  it.

A  movie  like  Private  School,  on  the  other  hand,  is  up-front  about  it’s  innocence.  Almost  proud  of  it.  In  it’s  svelte  89-minute  running  time,  you  won’t  find  a  single  hidden  agenda  or  ulterior  motive  on  the  part  of  the  filmmakers.  What  you  will  get  is  a  first-hand  look  at  how  embarrrassing  it  is  to  buy  condoms  from  your  local  pharmacist,  a  woman  riding  a  horse  topless                 ( and  in  slow  motion! ),  and  the  story  of  a  boy  dressing  up  like  a  girl  to  become  a  man.

I  am  37  years  old  now.  I’m  engaged.  I  no  longer  collect  baseball  cards.             And  I’m  happy  to  say  that  I  stopped  worrying  about  losin’  it  a  long  time  ago.  But  every  so  often,  I’ll  come  across  Fast  Times  At  Ridgemont  High or  Porky’s on  cable.  Usually,  I’ll  keep  moving on  to  sports  or  ‘Lost’.  But  occasionally,  something  forces  me  to  keep  watching,  and  I’ll  put  the  remote  down  and  settle  in  for  a  while.  I’m  not  going  to  lie.  The  movies  are  usually  worse  than  I  remembered.  But  they  still  have  an  inexplicable  hold  on  me.  Instantly,  I’m  14  again.  As  I  see  PeeWee  about  to  look  through  the  locker-room  peephole,  or  Phoebe  Cates  getting  out  of  the  swimming  pool  about  to  unlatch  her  red  bikini,  I’ll  still  catch  myself  instinctively  worrying  if  my  parents  are  home  and  if  I  should  change  the  channel.

But  of  course,  they  aren’t.  And  of  course,  I  won’t.

baioinzapped1

HIGHLY   RECOMMENDED   SUPPLEMENTAL   ARTICLE :

“They  Want  Us  To  Look :                                                                                        Through  The  Lens  Of  The  Teen  Sex  Comedies  Of  The  Early  1980s”

by   Andy  Selsberg,   http://www.believermag.com   ( May  2006 )

Advertisements